Movies

24:43
History Buffs: Braveheart
Well, you have all been asking for Braveheart and for this Christmas that's exactly what you're gonna get! Although this review may not look too kindly on what is regarded as one of the most historically inaccurate movies of all time. Braveheart is a 1995 historical drama epic film directed by and starring Mel Gibson. Gibson portrays William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish warrior who led the Scots in the First War of Scottish Independence against King Edward I of England. The story is based on Blind Harry's epic poem The Actes and Deidis of the Illustre and Vallyeant Campioun Schir William Wallace and was adapted for the screen by Randall Wallace. The film was nominated for ten Academy Awards at the 68th Academy Awards and won five: Best Picture, Best Makeup, Best Cinematography, Best Sound Editing, and Best Director. Randall Wallace, who wrote the screenplay, has acknowledged Blind Harry's 15th century epic poem The Acts and Deeds of Sir William Wallace, Knight of Elderslie as a major inspiration for the film.[26] In defending his script, Randall Wallace has said, "Is Blind Harry true? I don't know. I know that it spoke to my heart and that's what matters to me, that it spoke to my heart."[26] Blind Harry's poem is now not regarded as historically accurate, and although some incidents in the film which are not historically accurate are taken from Blind Harry (e.g. the hanging of Scottish nobles at the start), [27] there are large parts which are based neither on history nor Blind Harry (e.g. Wallace's affair with Princess Isabelle). Elizabeth Ewan describes Braveheart as a film which "almost totally sacrifices historical accuracy for epic adventure".[28] The "brave heart" refers in Scottish history to that of Robert the Bruce, and an attribution by William Edmondstoune Aytoun, in his poem Heart of Bruce, to Sir James the Good Douglas: "Pass thee first, thou dauntless heart, As thou wert wont of yore!", prior to Douglas' demise at the Battle of Teba in Andalusia.[29] It has been described as one of the most historically inaccurate modern films.[30] Sharon Krossa notes that the film contains numerous historical errors, beginning with the wearing of belted plaid by Wallace and his men. In that period "no Scots ... wore belted plaids (let alone kilts of any kind)." Moreover, when Highlanders finally did begin wearing the belted plaid, it was not "in the rather bizarre style depicted in the film". She compares the inaccuracy to "a film about Colonial America showing the colonial men wearing 20th century business suits, but with the jackets worn back-to-front instead of the right way around."[31] "The events aren't accurate, the dates aren't accurate, the characters aren't accurate, the names aren't accurate, the clothes aren't accurate—in short, just about nothing is accurate."[32] The belted plaid (feileadh mór léine) was not introduced until the 16th century.[33] Peter Traquair has referred to Wallace's "farcical representation as a wild and hairy highlander painted with woad (1,000 years too late) running amok in a tartan kilt (500 years too early)." [34] In 2009, the film was second on a list of "most historically inaccurate movies" in The Times.[30] In the humorous non-fictional historiography An Utterly Impartial History of Britain (2007), author John O'Farrell notes that Braveheart could not have been more historically inaccurate, even if a "Plasticine dog" had been inserted in the film and the title changed to William Wallace and Gromit.
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02:15:31
Till the Clouds Roll By
Till the Clouds Roll By (1946) A musical and fictionalized biography of American Broadway pioneer Jerome Kern (portrayed by Robert Walker), who was originally involved with the film, but died before it was completed. The film features renditions of the famous songs from his musical plays by contemporary stage artists, including a condensed production of his most famous: 'Showboat'. Plot: On the success of his latest and most elaborate Broadway musical "Show Boat", composer Jerome Kern (Robert Walker) reminisces to his chauffeur about his life that led to this point. He talks about: his long time friendship with arranger James Hessler who in large part helped him hone his craft, and who himself wanted to get out of arranging to focus on composing serious music; how he overcame the mentality of the time of Broadway producers of featuring the English music halls revues; how he met an English country lass named Eva Leale, who would become Mrs. Kern; his near death experience in almost boarding the ill-fated Lusitania sailing, the liner which was ultimately torpedoed and sank on that sailing; his longtime friendship with Hessler's daughter, Sally Hessler, whose want, as an adult, to be a Broadway performer led to a certain estrangement; and the specific events that led to the creation of "Show Boat" with lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II. With the advent of talking pictures, Kern's music, both existing songs as well as new songs written expressly for, would hit a broader audience through Hollywood movies. With Judy Garland, Lena Horne, Frank Sinatra and Angela Lansbury.
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